Carbon dating and its application in archeology

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Radiocarbon decays slowly in a living organism, and the amount lost is continually replenished as long as the organism takes in air or food.

Once the organism dies, however, it ceases to absorb carbon-14, so that the amount of the radiocarbon in its tissues steadily decreases.

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Understanding the age and period of existence of the excavated fossils and other organic objects will help the archaeologist to unravel human history and evolution in a scrupulous manner (Taylor 24).

Archaeologists utilize one of the revolutionary methods called the radio carbon dating to determine the approximate age of the organic materials including plant and animal parts up to 50000 years (Long).

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Libby and a few of his students at the University of Chicago: in 1960, he won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the invention.The half-life of an isotope like C14 is the time it takes for half of it to decay away: in C14, every 5,730 years, half of it is gone.So, if you measure the amount of C14 in a dead organism, you can figure out how long ago it stopped exchanging carbon with its atmosphere.Radiocarbon or C14 dating employs complex systems of measuring the unstable isotopes in once living matter.There are three forms of carbon that naturally occur forming the building blocks of all plant and animal life.

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